Linux Netbooks – Greguti http://greguti.com/ Thu, 23 Sep 2021 07:58:12 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://greguti.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/cropped-icon-32x32.png Linux Netbooks – Greguti http://greguti.com/ 32 32 Amazon Games Partners with Horizon Zero Dawn, Fable, and Battlefield Vets for New IP https://greguti.com/amazon-games-partners-with-horizon-zero-dawn-fable-and-battlefield-vets-for-new-ip/ https://greguti.com/amazon-games-partners-with-horizon-zero-dawn-fable-and-battlefield-vets-for-new-ip/#respond Wed, 22 Sep 2021 16:46:10 +0000 https://greguti.com/amazon-games-partners-with-horizon-zero-dawn-fable-and-battlefield-vets-for-new-ip/

Amazon’s attempt to enter the gaming industry has been a bit turbulent, to say the least, but they are sticking to their guns and expanding their third-party publishing efforts. Today, Amazon Games announced that it will release a new IP address for UK independent studio Glowmade. Although Glowmade is small, its 25 employees have impressive resumes, as the team includes veterans who have worked on Battlefield, Horizon Zero Dawn, Fable, and Little Big Planet. Glowmade previously announced the RustHeart game, which will be released through the EA Originals program.

We don’t know much about Glowmade’s new project yet, but it is described as a “creative online co-op experience”. Amazon Games VP Christoph Hartmann said the following about the new publishing deal …

Amazon Games hires former Ubisoft manager for its new studio in Montreal; Several unannounced games in preparation

Amazon Games is dedicated to finding and releasing the best games, whether they come from AAA studios or passionate independent teams. Glowmade is a team of seasoned developers with the creativity and experience to create games players will love. We are thrilled with the opportunity to work closely with this talented studio to provide our players with the best gaming experiences.

Meanwhile, Glowmade studio director Jonny Hopper is understandably excited to get support from Amazon Games.

The Glowmade team have worked incredibly hard on our exciting new intellectual property, and Amazon Games has been a great partner. The commitment of the Amazon Games team to helping us realize our creative vision has been incredible. We can’t wait to show the world what we do.

Amazon Games’ MMORPG New World will finally launch next week – its first major launch after numerous game cancellations. They will also release the popular Korean MMO Lost Ark in North America in early 2022.

No release date has been announced for Glowmade’s game. Looks like it’s pretty early in development, so don’t expect a release date for a while.

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Nothing But ‘Net: laptops for the start of the school year https://greguti.com/nothing-but-net-laptops-for-the-start-of-the-school-year/ https://greguti.com/nothing-but-net-laptops-for-the-start-of-the-school-year/#respond Thu, 16 Sep 2021 10:47:10 +0000 https://greguti.com/nothing-but-net-laptops-for-the-start-of-the-school-year/

By Joseph Moran

September 02, 2008

Small and light, netbook PCs, which focus on mobile computing applications, are both affordable and ultraportable, making them the ideal solution for parents or students looking for a new laptop with a limited budget.

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As the new school year arrives and many students need a new computer, laptops are often at the top of the list, given space considerations and the need for portability.

Laptops have always been available in a fairly wide range of capacities, sizes, weights, and price tags, but this year marks the advent of a new class of laptops known as the “netbook”. », A basic laptop designed to be particularly light. , compact and inexpensive. These attributes can appeal to almost anyone, but they are especially so for a student on a tight budget who needs a computer to carry all day from class to class.

What are the characteristics of a netbook? There isn’t really an official definition, but netbooks generally have small footprints (typically no taller or wider than an 8½ by 11 inch sheet of paper) and are extremely light, tipping the scales. at only two to three pounds. It’s much smaller and half to one-third the weight of a full-size laptop. Small and light laptops aren’t a new concept – look at the MacBook Air or the Lenovo X300, for example – but what makes netbooks unique are their relatively low prices of $ 300 to $ 500, (although some netbooks can easily exceed the upper end of the range). depending on their configuration).

Small PCs

Before you can determine if a netbook makes sense to you (or the person you’re buying it for), it’s helpful to keep in mind some of the trade-offs it requires. To reduce size and weight and increase battery life, netbooks use components designed for low power consumption rather than high performance, so you won’t find things like processors. dual core or sophisticated graphics chips. This makes them unsuitable for things that require moderate to high computing power, especially games, but, that said, netbooks can be more than enough for the basic computing tasks that most people do most of the time. such as browsing the web, keeping in touch with email or instant messaging, working with documents, or basic media playback.

Given their small dimensions, netbooks come with small screens and relatively low resolution – 7-10 inches and often with a resolution of 1024 x 600 compared to 14 or 15 inches and 1280 x 800 for one. typical laptop. In addition to 512MB to 1GB of system RAM, many netbooks come with standard hard drives, although they are not spacious by laptop standards. Some netbooks use solid state drives (SSD) instead of hard drives for storage or offer them as an option because they are lighter and faster than hard drives and the absence of moving parts makes them more reliable and resistant to damage. shocks (if the device is abandoned, for example), but they are also more expensive and offer less capacity than hard drives.

When it comes to operating systems, many netbooks run versions of Linux because they are cheaper than Windows, and Linux tends to perform better on modest hardware. These devices come with the software needed to handle the basic computer tasks mentioned above, but if you are more comfortable with Windows or want to install Windows software, you can get some netbooks that come with XP instead. . (Netbooks currently don’t have the punch to run Vista well, although one of the products listed below, the HP Mini-Note 2133 offers it as an option.)

Lastly, many high-end netbooks can cost as much or even a little more than entry-level laptops, which is good if portability is your main concern (the difference between lugging around a netbook and a laptop of five at six pounds can be like night and day), but if you think you need more power and are willing to carry the extra weight, a conventional laptop may be a better choice.

But, in an age where computing revolves more and more around common tasks and ubiquitous Internet access via Wi-Fi (b / g support is a de-required netbook feature), netbooks can be a great option for anyone who doesn’t. You don’t need the capabilities or bulkiness of a regular laptop.

Over the past six months or so, the nascent netbook market has grown dramatically and new manufacturers and models are sprouting faster than weeds in empty land. The following list is therefore only a glimpse of some of the most outstanding models available today. (At least one major vendor, Dell, has yet to jump into the netbook fray, although a product announcement is expected overnight.)

Acer Aspire one, from $ 329

Available in four brilliant shades and with a generous 120 GB hard drive, the Acer Aspire is available in Linux and Windows XP versions.

Asus Eee PC, from $ 299

One of the first netbooks to hit the market, the Asus Eee PC now includes a diverse (one might even say baffling) collection of different models. The flagship 1000 model has 802.11n wireless and an extended capacity battery, but weighs just over 3 pounds and costs around $ 600. [Read our review here.]

Everex Cloudbook CE1200V / 1201V, $ 399 / $ 449

The Cloudbook’s 7-inch, 800 x 480 display is one of the smallest and lowest on the market, though at two pounds the unit is also one of the lightest. The CE1200V comes with Linux, while the 1201V gives you XP instead, plus more memory and hard drive space.

HP Mini-Note 2133, starting at $ 499

HP’s Mini-Note 2133 (pictured, right) is indeed pricey (the top-end model flirts with $ 800), but it has one of the highest-resolution displays (1280 x 768) found in a netbook and is the only one we know of that offers Windows Vista as an option.

Lenovo IdeaPad S10, from $ 429

While not yet shipping at the time of this writing, Lenovo is now taking orders for the S10. All models are equipped with Windows XP Home and sport a spacious 10.2-inch screen (for a netbook).

MPC TXTbook PC, from $ 499

Based on Intel’s Classmate PC, which was one of the first netbooks and one designed for developing countries, the TXTbook has a built-in handle and is aimed specifically at children in Kindergarten to Grade 6 (or more precisely, to their parents).

MSI Wind, $ 549

MSI offers half a dozen versions of its Wind netbook, mostly with cosmetic differences – it’s available in white, black, and pink – but they all include a 10-inch display, an 80GB hard drive, and XP.

Sylvania G Netbook, $ 399

It’s basically a rebadged version of the Cloudbook 1200V, but with 1GB of standard RAM instead of 512MB.

To learn more about netbooks, read “Opinion: Mini Mobile PC: Now Comes the Hard Part”, “Review: Asus Eee PC 4G Laptop”, “Eee, Atom, Aspire, Wind: It’s a Small (Notebook) World at Computex. “

To learn more about Wi-Fi and schools / students, read “Big WLAN on Campus”, “Schools Integrate Wi-Fi into Disaster Response Plans”, “Schools Wi-Fi from the future “.

Latest posts by Eric Sandler (see everything)

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How to Install Linux on Any PC or Laptop https://greguti.com/how-to-install-linux-on-any-pc-or-laptop/ https://greguti.com/how-to-install-linux-on-any-pc-or-laptop/#respond Mon, 06 Sep 2021 13:15:00 +0000 https://greguti.com/how-to-install-linux-on-any-pc-or-laptop/

You’re considering Linux as your replacement operating system, but there’s a problem: you don’t know how to install it.

Switching to Linux can be straightforward. Choose a Linux operating system (OS), write the installation media, and sit back and wait. But while simple, it comes with a few complications. Here we take a look at how to install Linux on your PC with minimal hassle.

What you need to install Linux

Basic Linux OS

To install Linux on a computer or laptop, you will need:

  • A suitable target device (PC or laptop) – note that installing Linux destroys existing data on your computer, so a clean system is recommended

  • A downloaded Linux ISO file

  • Installation media (writable CD or DVD, or USB key)

That’s all we can say about it. However, you may spend some time choosing and downloading the ISO file before you are ready to begin.

Choose a Linux operating system (“Distro”)

Before continuing, you will need to choose and download a Linux operating system to install on the computer of your choice.

Various Linux operating systems (also known as “distros”, short for “distribution”) are widely used, from big names like Ubuntu and Mint to Fedora, Manjaro, Elementary and Pop! _OS. Each of them balances usability with productivity, as you would expect from a mainstream operating system.

While there is some difference between these operating systems (although all of them are Linux), you can expect similar levels of compatibility with your computer’s hardware.

Related: The Best Linux Operating Systems

Note on target device: You can use desktop or laptop to run Linux. Some versions of Linux are particularly suited to older hardware like low-specification laptops and netbooks. If this is something you have in mind, take the time to research your computer model to find the best Linux operating system for it.

Overall, take this as a rule of thumb: Choose a Linux distribution by first making sure it works with the hardware you plan to install it on.

How to download Linux on your PC

With your Linux operating system selected, you will be ready to download it to your computer to prepare the files for installation.

In most cases, a Linux distribution downloads in ISO format. This is a disk image format, which can be written to CD, DVD, or USB flash storage. You can expect ISO files to typically be around 2GB in size, although some more compact distros may be half that size.

As such, you will need to make sure that you have the necessary storage space on your download PC to store the ISO before preparing it for installation. Downloading is simply a matter of visiting the Linux distribution homepage and downloading the option that best suits the computer you plan to install Linux on.

Prepare Linux for Installation

With a Windows 10 or macOS computer, the operating system is preinstalled. However, you may have found yourself in a situation where the operating system needs to be reinstalled. In such cases, you would take the time to prepare the installation media, using an optical disc or a USB disc.

A similar process is required for installing Linux.

Windows 10 and macOS both make it easy to mount an ISO file in the operating system, allowing you to browse the contents of the disk image. However, writing the ISO file to the intended installation media is a bit trickier and requires a dedicated tool.

Related: How To Make A Bootable USB Drive From An ISO

(MacOS users should check out our guide on mounting and burning ISO images on a Mac.)

Once the installation media has been created, safely remove it from your computer.

How to install Linux on a laptop

Installing Linux essentially requires that you tell your computer to boot from the installation media rather than the hard drive.

muo-windows-install-linux-vm-manjaro-20-installer

With your laptop turned off, connect the installation media and boot the laptop. If the media is detected, you will be able to start the installation process (or boot into Live mode, see below). This is a guided process, with steps for your region and location, connecting to the wireless network, and selecting a disk partition.

The exact steps involved will depend on the chosen Linux distribution. Note that if wireless networking is not an option, it is worth connecting the computer to Ethernet to allow downloading of updates during the installation process.

How to install Linux on your PC

Installing Linux on a desktop is very similar to installing on a laptop. There is arguably wider hardware support for desktops, but overall the process is the same.

muo-linux-ubuntu-virtualbox-create-install-erase

Where it may differ is in the presence of an optical drive. As CD and DVD drives are increasingly scarce on laptops, it makes sense to use USB installation media; with an older desktop computer, you can probably use the optical drive for installation. While it might be slower, it can also be more convenient than looking for a USB drive.

Again, the exact steps required to install Linux on your computer will depend on the specific distribution. However, the guided process should help you make the right choices.

Forget the installation: how to get Linux on a computer without installing it

At this point, you should know how to install Linux on a laptop or desktop. But what if you want to run Linux on your computer without installing it? You have three options for running Linux without removing the existing operating system:

  1. Running Linux in Live Mode – Linux distributions have a bootable live CD environment (including USB media) that allows you to use the operating system without installing it
  2. Run Linux in a virtual machine – virtualization is a great way to run and get familiar with Linux without installing it on a physical hard drive
  3. Configure the Windows Subsystem for Linux – Windows 10 has an optional tool to run Linux, which is simple to activate and allows you to install a Linux distribution directly from the Microsoft Store

Whichever option you select, you will always be able to enjoy an extended Linux experience. This flexibility is one of the main reasons for the enduring success of Linux.

Congratulations, you have installed Linux on your computer

As you can see, installing Linux is not as complicated as you might think. All it needs is a suitable target computer, the right version of Linux, and the right installation media.

The installation process is guided in most cases, helping you make sure that your Linux computer is configured exactly the way you want it to be. And if you don’t have a spare computer, installing Linux on your existing PC with a virtual machine or Windows Subsystem for Linux is also an option, as is running Linux as Live. CD.


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How Chrome Killed Internet Explorer: Extensions, Android, and Innovation https://greguti.com/how-chrome-killed-internet-explorer-extensions-android-and-innovation/ https://greguti.com/how-chrome-killed-internet-explorer-extensions-android-and-innovation/#respond Sat, 04 Sep 2021 17:00:00 +0000 https://greguti.com/how-chrome-killed-internet-explorer-extensions-android-and-innovation/

In just over 13 years, Google’s Chrome browser has grown from a new project to the juggernaut we know today. Today, Chrome is by far the world’s most popular browser for desktop and mobile. You could even say that Chrome killed Internet Explorer. So how did Google achieve this incredible feat in such a short period of time?

Most of the time, they did it from scratch. Microsoft, along with Mozilla and others, continued to build their browsers on legacy code. Google used a few existing tools to create Chrome, but for the most part their approach to the browser was completely new.

When Google entered the scene, Microsoft hadn’t really thought about reinventing the browser experience. In fact, Internet Explorer worked the same in 2008 as it did in 1998. Google intended to change all of that. In the beginning, Chrome wanted to be a complete platform for exploring the web in a new way, not just a browser. These aspirations drove Google to innovate in several key ways, eventually establishing itself with the largest browser market share in 2012.

In this article, we’ll take a look at how Google propelled Chrome to the top from 2008 to 2012. There have been three key factors: the open source nature of Chromium, the revolution in web browsing with extensions, and the rise of Android and Chromebook. This article kicks off our web browser history series, celebrating Google’s 23rd birthday on September 4, 2021.

2008: Launch in beta version

Google released the Chrome browser in beta on September 2, 2008. It was a very interesting time for technology. Smartphones were fairly new and apps weren’t much of a big deal in 2008. Already looking to the future, Google developed Chrome on the HTML layout engine, WebKit, which would support web apps like theirs. popular Maps service. At the time of the beta launch, Google did a comic as to why they made a new browser out of a sea of ​​existing alternatives.

Google Chrome Launch Comic

The comic itself is quite long at 39 pages, but the first page gives a pretty good summary of Google’s philosophy. In their minds, the experience of the navigator was completely shattered. People no longer used the Internet just to access school research articles, the Web was a big place with content to consume. Perhaps the biggest unique advantage of Chrome at the start was the sandboxing of separate browser tabs. Browser crashes were quite common, especially in Internet Explorer. Sandbox meant that if one tab crashed, the whole session didn’t end with it.

Indeed, separate tab sandboxing was an initiative that predicted the future of the web, where applications would replace web pages as the primary tool for users. With that in mind, Google took another important step by taking over browser space – in September 2008, the open source Chromium project was launched. Not only was open source in vogue at the time, it also sparked developer interest in Chrome as a project. Google knew they would need developers to speed up Chrome improvements, as well as build their gallery of upcoming extensions.

2009: Chrome OS and extensions

By 2009, it was clear that Chrome was a big deal. That summer, Google announced that they were building a complete Chrome-based operating system, aptly named “Chrome OS”. At the same time, more and more users were converting to Chrome. In July 2009, over 30 million people were using Google’s new browser. A user base of 30 million in less than a year is pretty incredible, certainly something never seen before in the browser wars.

While Chrome OS and the growing user base were a huge novelty, they weren’t the biggest Chrome story of 2009. In December 2009, Google launched the Extensions Gallery. Extensions were revolutionary at the time. This was the big turning point, where Google hoped to convince users that apps were the future of web browsing. Both users and developers loved the extensions. In just over a year, the plugins gallery had over 10,000 plugins and themes. Personalization is a deeply personal thing, and people have embraced the idea of ​​customizing the look and functionality of their browser.

Chrome Extensions Gallery

At the end of 2009, Chrome already held a 5% market share. While this number seems low, keep in mind that this was a brand new product, struggling to compete in an established market. Themes and extensions, along with Chrome’s incredible speed thanks to sandboxing, were poised to make even bigger gains in 2010.

2010: Monetization and Chrome Web Store

With Chrome growing at an exponential rate, it was time for Google to start building on the success. In August 2010, Google started charging developers $ 5 to publish their Chrome apps to the Extensions Gallery. It was both an income opportunity and a security measure. The $ 5 fee allowed Google to implement domain verification for all new apps submitted for publication.

Throughout the year, Chrome continued to see its biggest user increase on record. Tripling from 40 million to 120 million during the year 2010, Google legitimately threatened the first place of Microsoft for the market share of browsers. Perhaps the most interesting thing is that Microsoft hasn’t done much to prevent Chrome’s rise to the top. Instead of adding new platform independent features, Microsoft focused on deeper integration with Windows in Internet Explorer 9.

Unfortunately, most of these features added by IE9 for Windows already existed in Chrome. There is no doubt that if Microsoft released a truly redesigned version of IE in 2010, they would at least have delayed Chrome’s rise to number one.

IE9 beauty of the web

At the end of 2010, Google launched the Chrome Web Store. Unlike the smaller Extension Gallery, this was a more polished app store for Chrome users. New developers have joined us, and Chrome has quickly become not only the fastest browser, but also the most versatile. Chrome Web Store extensions, plugins, and themes have shaped the way people use the web and even the way web content is monetized. With ad unit extensions readily available, the traditional method of monetizing web content with ads was no longer viable. This introduced whole new opportunities for Google to innovate in its other key business: advertising.

Chrome IO 2010 online store

Chrome’s growth was about speed control and doing things differently than all other browsers, but Google still wasn’t happy. It was time for Chrome to get some new tricks, some dedicated hardware, and a fresh coat of paint.

2011: A new logo, Chromebooks and the tab page

From the start, Chrome had a 3D logo. As of March 2011, this design seemed quite outdated. Apple started the trend of bringing flat icons to iOS and Google didn’t want their design to look out of place. The design change was fairly minimal, but quite impactful. Keeping the same color scheme, Google flattened the Chrome logo to give it a more modern look.

The Chrome logo changes in 2011

In May 2011, Google launched Chromebooks. While netbooks were quite popular in 2011, the idea of ​​a laptop without a hard drive was quite alien. Chromebooks would handle all tasks through the Chrome browser. Initially, the proliferation of Chromebooks was stopped by the launch of the Apple iPad. Fortunately, with some persistence from OEMs and tweaking from Google, Chromebooks have become a hit, especially in the education industry.

With Chrome OS now running on dedicated hardware, Google had yet another outlet to increase the user base of Chrome as a browser. Over the next decade, Chromebooks will become ubiquitous in the budget computing segment, now running both Android and Linux apps.

Launch of the first Chromebooks in May 2011

To crown 2011, Chrome launched another feature that will soon be standard in all browsers: the New Tab page. The idea was great, although incredibly simple. Collecting all of your favorite Chrome apps or pages that you frequently visit made sense. As people learned how to customize the New Tab page, browsing the web became easier and working more intuitive.

At the end of 2011, Chrome held nearly 25% of the market share, almost a tie for second place with Firefox. To take the final step, Google needed to put Chrome on mobile devices.

2012: Chrome arrives on Android and iOS

Looking back, it’s incredibly surprising how long it took for Chrome to launch on Android. Android became official as an operating system in September 2008, around the same time the beta version of Chrome debuted. Given that these are two Google products with similar birthdays, Chrome should have launched on Android before 2012. However, mobile was exactly the platform Google needed to take the top spot. They didn’t want to spoil it.Chrome is coming to Android 2012

In February 2012, Chrome was finally released on Android. With millions of Android devices in the market, it has been a huge catalyst to capture a lot of market share with just one move. Just four months later, Google launched Chrome for iOS. While Safari was even more popular among iPhone users, the opportunity to capture some of this user base was enormous. It only took a few more months for Google to permanently dethrone Microsoft.

Chrome is coming to iOS 2012

Towards the end of summer 2012, it was announced that Google had taken the lead in the browser market, with 31% of users on Chrome. Microsoft certainly helped hasten their demise by not really innovating with the functionality of Internet Explorer at a time when Chrome was pivoting to the future of web applications.

Google wasn’t done yet, but they accomplished what they set out to do at the start: Chrome killed Internet Explorer and changed the way people use the web.

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Laptop vs Chromebook: what’s the difference and which best suits your needs https://greguti.com/laptop-vs-chromebook-whats-the-difference-and-which-best-suits-your-needs/ https://greguti.com/laptop-vs-chromebook-whats-the-difference-and-which-best-suits-your-needs/#respond Sat, 28 Aug 2021 10:00:00 +0000 https://greguti.com/laptop-vs-chromebook-whats-the-difference-and-which-best-suits-your-needs/

Acer’s updated two-in-one Chromebook Spin 713 is the first to support Thunderbolt 4 and is verified by Intel Evo.

Josh Goldman / CNET

Chromebooks are laptop and two in one running on Google’s Chrome operating system. The material can look like any other portable, but the minimalistic web browser-based Chrome OS is a different experience from the the Windows and Mac OS laptops you’re probably used to. Whether you are planning to upgrade to a Windows laptop or Macbook, your kid got one from their school, or you’re just curious about Chrome OS, here’s everything you need to know.

Read more: Best laptop under $ 500 of 2021

When Chromebooks first arrived in 2011 they’ve been regularly ridiculed – and rightly so – for their limited functionality and reliance on a consistent internet connection. The operating system turns 10 this year and today’s Chromebooks are a long way from where they started, but some things haven’t changed and you might not be willing to work with the limitations they have. Also, if you don’t feel like reading this and just prefer to experience Chrome OS, here’s how to run it temporarily on any laptop using a cheap usb stick you’ve probably already hung around.


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Here’s why a Chromebook might be all the laptop you need


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What can or can’t I do with a Chromebook?

When Chrome OS first launched, it was basically Google’s Chrome web browser. For those who are used to an operating system like Windows and Mac, the average Chromebook is little more than a laptop running a web browser and that’s it.

While Chrome OS never matured beyond that, the fact is that a lot can be done entirely on the web these days. Take stock of everything you do on a daily basis and you might find that there is nothing you cannot accomplish with Chrome at its most basic level.

That said, a Windows laptop or MacBook can run the Chrome browser as well as other software supported by these operating systems. Even if you don’t immediately need a particular software, it’s good to have this option. Additionally, if you buy a Chromebook for distance learning with Google Classroom, a Mac or Windows PC will work as well.

samsung-galaxy-chromebook-2-03

Samsung’s Galaxy Chromebook 2 is a premium model with better performance than most.

Josh Goldman / CNET

In this sense, Chromebooks are not natively compatible with Windows or Mac software. You can use VMware on Chromebooks to run Windows apps and there are Linux software support, too much. Additionally, current models can run Android apps and there are also web apps available through Google’s Chrome Web Store.

Read more: Best Laptops, Desktops & Tablets For Designers And Creatives In 2021

One of the big obstacles here for many people is accessing Microsoft Office. You can’t install the full Office software on a Chromebook, but Microsoft makes both web and Android versions available in the Chrome and Google Play stores, respectively. But generally speaking, if you need or want a specific Windows or Mac app – and there is no suitable web or Android app substitute and you don’t want to use VMware – don’t buy a Chromebook.

Additionally, if you need advanced photo and video editing capabilities, you will need a Windows, Mac, or Linux laptop. Basic editing of photos and videos is fine, but Chromebooks generally don’t offer the graphics performance you need for demanding tasks or, again, the ability to install Windows or Mac software and games. . On the other hand, with game streaming services like Google Stadia, Nvidia GeForce Now and Xbox cloud games, Chromebooks can now be used for more than Android and browser-based games. You can also install and play Linux games, although you need a high-end Chromebook to do so. In addition, there are several Android apps available for editing photos and videos as well, including Adobe options.

Asus Chromebook Flip CM5

Today’s Chromebooks like the Asus CM5 are ready to play cloud gaming services, Android games, and even Linux games.

Josh Goldman / CNET

What is a good Chromebook?

Several years ago, all Chromebooks were pretty much the same no matter which company made them. Today, there is a much greater variety of laptops and two-in-ones – convertibles and tablets – to take advantage of the current capabilities of Chrome OS. You will always find more sizes and styles when it comes to Windows laptops, especially if you need cutting edge processing and graphics performance, but the variety of options is much better than in the past.

If you’re just looking for a good, basic Chromebook experience, the small, lightweight OS has minimal hardware requirements and so do web apps. Having a faster, higher-end processor, more memory, and more storage for files and apps will help move demanding multitasking forward, but if not, here’s what I recommend when wondering what base specs to look for. :

  • Intel Celeron or Core i-series, AMD Ryzen or MediaTek processors
  • 4 GB of memory or more
  • 64 GB of storage
  • Full HD display (1920 x 1080 pixels)

These recommendations are flexible. For example, you can get a screen with a resolution of 1366 x 768, but the inexpensive models used in low-end Chromebooks look especially soft next to the Full HD models. And you can get by with 32GB of on-board storage as long as there’s a microSD card slot to complement it, or you don’t plan on downloading a lot of Android apps. Unlike a regular laptop, a Chromebook relies more on cloud storage for files than local storage. It’s also worth noting that storage and memory are often soldered together and cannot be upgraded after the fact, so you can plan ahead.

Whatever Chromebook you buy, before you buy it, you should know the Automatic update expiration date, or WUA. Currently, non-Google hardware is only supported for so long before it stops receiving Chrome OS and browser updates, including security updates. For models released in 2020, the date is around 7-8 years from the device’s initial release, but that’s not always the case. Google maintains a list of AUE dates for all models, and you should check it before purchasing a Chromebook, new or used.

Do Chromebooks Need an Internet Connection?

When Chromebooks first launched, they became clipboards when offline. Fortunately, things have improved as Google has improved the offline capabilities and popular apps like Netflix, YouTube, and Spotify have offline options as well.

Read: The best VPNs for 2021

For a regular laptop, being offline is a bit less of a problem since you are using installed software that records to internal storage. While neither of the two experiences is great offline these days, Chromebooks aren’t a great choice if you don’t want and can’t be online most of the time. On the positive side, Google has made it easy for Android users to turn their phones into instant mobile hotspots and have Chromebooks and Android devices work better together.

Are Chromebooks Inexpensive?

Due to Chrome OS’s low hardware requirements, not only can Chromebooks be lighter and smaller than the average laptop, but they’re also generally less expensive.

New Windows laptops for $ 200 are rare and, frankly, rarely worth buying. Finding a good $ 200 Chromebook, on the other hand, is pretty easy to do (or at least that was before COVID). And while spending more will get you better build quality, more features, or faster performance, even these premium Chromebooks typically start between $ 400 and $ 500, but can easily go over $ 1,000 depending on your needs.

With Windows laptops, you typically have to spend $ 700 or more to get a slim and light model with decent performance and battery life that will maintain its performance for years to come.

Sarah Tew / CNET

The simplicity of a Chromebook can’t be beat. If everything you do can be done in a web browser or with web or Android apps, there is little reason not to use a Chrome device. Although with support for Android, Linux, Parallels, and VMware, you can do a lot more today than when it arrived in 2011.

Read our Acer Chromebook Spin 713 (2021) review.

Joshua Goldman / CNET

With a wide range of models, sizes and styles that can be configured with all kinds of components and available at prices ranging from a few hundred dollars to thousands, a Windows or Mac laptop offers a greater variety of performance and design. use, especially if you want to easily use software or play games available only on these operating systems.

Read our Asus ZenBook 13 review.


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Laptop vs Chromebook: how are they different and which work best for you https://greguti.com/laptop-vs-chromebook-how-are-they-different-and-which-work-best-for-you/ https://greguti.com/laptop-vs-chromebook-how-are-they-different-and-which-work-best-for-you/#respond Fri, 20 Aug 2021 17:58:47 +0000 https://greguti.com/laptop-vs-chromebook-how-are-they-different-and-which-work-best-for-you/

Acer’s updated two-in-one Chromebook Spin 713 is the first to support Thunderbolt 4 and is verified by Intel Evo.

Josh Goldman / CNET

Chromebooks are laptop and two in one running on Google’s Chrome operating system. The material can look like any other portable, but the minimalistic web browser-based Chrome OS is a different experience than the Windows and MacOS laptops you’re probably used to. Whether you’re planning to upgrade to a Windows laptop or MacBook, your kid got one from school, or you’re just curious about Chrome OS, here’s everything you need to know.

Read more: Best laptop under $ 500 of 2021

When Chromebooks first arrived in 2011 they were regularly derided – and rightly so – for their limited functionality and reliance on a consistent internet connection. The operating system turns 10 this year and today’s Chromebooks are a long way from where they started, but some things haven’t changed and you might not be willing to work with the limitations they have. Also, if you don’t feel like reading this and just prefer to experience Chrome OS, here’s how to run it temporarily on any laptop using a cheap usb stick you’ve probably already hung around.


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What can or can’t I do with a Chromebook?

When Chrome OS first launched, it was basically Google’s Chrome web browser. For those who are used to an operating system like Windows and Mac, the average Chromebook is little more than a laptop running a web browser and that’s it.

While Chrome OS never matured beyond that, the fact is that a lot can be done entirely on the web these days. Take stock of everything you do on a daily basis and you may find that there is nothing you cannot accomplish with Chrome at its most basic level.

That said, a Windows laptop or MacBook can run the Chrome browser as well as other software supported by these operating systems. Even if you don’t immediately need a particular software, it’s good to have this option. Additionally, if you buy a Chromebook for distance learning with Google Classroom, a Mac or Windows PC will work as well.

samsung-galaxy-chromebook-2-03

Samsung’s Galaxy Chromebook 2 is a premium model with better performance than most.

Josh Goldman / CNET

In this sense, Chromebooks are not natively compatible with Windows or Mac software. You can use VMware on Chromebooks to run Windows apps and there are Linux software support, too much. Additionally, current models can run Android apps and there are also web apps available through Google’s Chrome Web Store.

Read more: Best Laptops, Desktops & Tablets For Designers And Creatives In 2021

One of the big hurdles here for many people is accessing Microsoft Office. You can’t install the full Office software on a Chromebook, but Microsoft makes both web and Android versions available in the Chrome and Google Play stores, respectively. But generally speaking, if you need or want a specific Windows or Mac app – and there is no suitable web or Android app substitute and you don’t want to use VMware – don’t buy a Chromebook.

Additionally, if you need advanced photo and video editing capabilities, you will need a Windows, Mac, or Linux laptop. Basic editing of photos and videos is fine, but Chromebooks generally don’t offer the graphics performance you need for demanding tasks or, again, the ability to install Windows or Mac software and games. . On the other hand, with game streaming services like Google Stadia, Nvidia GeForce Now and Xbox cloud games, Chromebooks can now be used for more than Android and browser-based games. You can also install and play Linux games, although you need a high-end Chromebook to do so. In addition, there are several Android apps available for editing photos and videos as well, including Adobe options.

Asus Chromebook Flip CM5

Today’s Chromebooks like the Asus CM5 are ready to play cloud gaming services, Android games, and even Linux games.

Josh Goldman / CNET

What is a good Chromebook?

Several years ago, all Chromebooks were pretty much the same no matter which company made them. Now there’s a much wider variety of laptops and two-in-ones – convertibles and tablets – to take advantage of Chrome OS’s current capabilities. You will always find more sizes and styles when it comes to Windows laptops, especially if you need cutting edge processing and graphics performance, but the variety of options is much better than in the past.

If you’re just looking for a good, basic Chromebook experience, the small, lightweight OS has minimal hardware requirements and so do web apps. Having a faster, higher-end processor, more memory, and more storage for files and apps will help move demanding multitasking forward, but if not, here’s what I recommend when wondering what base specs to look for. :

  • Intel Celeron or Core i-series, AMD Ryzen or MediaTek processors
  • 4 GB of memory or more
  • 64 GB of storage
  • Full HD display (1920 x 1080 pixels)

These recommendations are flexible. For example, you can get a screen with a resolution of 1366 x 768, but the inexpensive models used in low-end Chromebooks look especially soft next to the Full HD models. And you can get by with 32GB of on-board storage as long as there’s a microSD card slot to complement it, or you don’t plan on downloading a lot of Android apps. Unlike a regular laptop, a Chromebook relies more on cloud storage for files than local storage. It’s also worth noting that storage and memory are often soldered together and cannot be upgraded after the fact, so you can plan ahead.

Whatever Chromebook you buy, before you buy it, you should know the Automatic update expiration date, or WUA. Currently, non-Google hardware is only supported for a period of time before it stops receiving Chrome OS and browser updates, including security updates. For models released in 2020, the date is around 7-8 years from the device’s initial release, but that’s not always the case. Google maintains a list of AUE dates for all models and you should check it before purchasing a Chromebook, new or used.

Do Chromebooks Need an Internet Connection?

When Chromebooks first launched, they became clipboards when offline. Fortunately, things have improved as Google has improved the offline capabilities and popular apps like Netflix, YouTube, and Spotify have offline options as well.

Read: The best VPNs for 2021

For a regular laptop, being offline is a bit less of a problem since you are using installed software that records to internal storage. While neither of the two experiences is great offline these days, Chromebooks aren’t a great choice if you don’t want and can’t be online most of the time. On the positive side, Google has made it easy for Android users to turn their phones into instant mobile hotspots and have Chromebooks and Android devices work better together.

Are Chromebooks Inexpensive?

Due to Chrome OS’s low hardware requirements, not only can Chromebooks be lighter and smaller than the average laptop, but they’re also generally cheaper.

New Windows laptops for $ 200 are rare and, frankly, rarely worth buying. Finding a good $ 200 Chromebook, on the other hand, is pretty easy to do (or at least that was before COVID). And while spending more will get you better build quality, more features, or faster performance, even these premium Chromebooks typically start between $ 400 and $ 500, but can easily go over $ 1,000 depending on your needs.

With Windows laptops, you typically have to spend $ 700 or more to get a slim and light model with decent performance and battery life that will maintain its performance for years to come.

Sarah Tew / CNET

The simplicity of a Chromebook can’t be beat. If everything you do can be done in a web browser or with web or Android apps, there is little reason not to use a Chrome device. Although with support for Android, Linux, Parallels, and VMware, you can do a lot more today than when it arrived in 2011.

Read our Acer Chromebook Spin 713 (2021) review.

Joshua Goldman / CNET

With a wide range of models, sizes and styles that can be configured with all kinds of components and available at prices ranging from a few hundred dollars to thousands, a Windows or Mac laptop offers a greater variety of performance and design. use, especially if you want to easily use software or play games available only on these operating systems.

Read our Asus ZenBook 13 review.


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30 years of Linux history told through distributions https://greguti.com/30-years-of-linux-history-told-through-distributions/ https://greguti.com/30-years-of-linux-history-told-through-distributions/#respond Tue, 17 Aug 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://greguti.com/30-years-of-linux-history-told-through-distributions/

Happy birthday, Linux. At 30, you have made a great reputation for yourself. After driving the boom in open source software, you turned the world of proprietary computing upside down.

Of course, you had a somewhat premature start. You entered the tech world with little more than a core to call your own. That was the intention of a young computer science student from Helsinki named Linus Torvalds while carrying out this personal fun project. In 1991, he created your code that would become the basis for a whole new approach to computer operating systems.

The rest of this story, as they say, is history.

You first underwent a name change. You started out by calling yourself Freax, as in “free”, “freak” and “x” (referring to the operating system of the Unix computer). But eventually, your creator ended up sharing his own lineage with you, calling you Linux.

Linus and his so-called computer cohorts have backed you up with other code components to talk to. This combination has formed a growing list of Linux distributions to power a variety of free computer operating systems.

Among the first, in 1992, Slackware was created by Patrick Volkerding. You both have been a hit for years by owning 80% of the market for non-proprietary computers. A few years later, you were in good company. However, some of Slackware’s popularity waned with the arrival of Red Hat Linux. But your kernel has remained the soul of what makes Linux, well, Linux.

In 1992, four guys – Thomas Fehr, Roland Dyroff, Burchard Steinbild, and Hubert Mante – introduced you to a new playmate called the Suse Project. This creation formed Suse Linux. A few years later, Suse created separate enterprise editions for desktops and servers. OpenSuse joined parents as a free open source version.

More family diversity

Debian joined the family line as one of the first full-fledged Linux distributions in August 1993, created by Ian Murdock. It took him three more years to release the first stable version. What made your Debian cousin so important was Murdock’s design for a Linux distribution that anyone can download and use for free. It eliminated the need for users to compile their own applications from source files.

Murdock made Debian Linux user friendly and easy to adopt using a live CD. This allowed new users to try Linux without installing it to run it.

Business users enjoyed a particular uptake when Red Hat Linux, released in 1995, released Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) in 2003 as a paid support distribution. Business-oriented home users benefited from a free community edition. Fedora has become the testing ground for many features promoted in RHEL releases.

In 2000, Daniel Robbins introduced Gentoo Linux to the Linux world. It targeted developers and corporate users with a strong connection to an alternative Unix-like BSD operating system that made network management easier.


That same year, Judd Vinet introduced Arch Linux to the world. It was based on the concept of deploying updated components in existing installations in order to eliminate major reinstallation steps. This advanced concept oriented the new distribution towards more experienced users who were better equipped to handle the maintenance and more complex configurations required by Arch coding.

A touch of modernity

A major development in the adoption of the Linux operating system for industry and the home occurred in 2004 with the release of Ubuntu Linux. Its founder, South African mogul Mark Richard Shuttleworth, developed Ubuntu to be an easier and more user-friendly way to use the young Linux operating system. His business targeted home users and small businesses as well as large enterprises.

A new entrant in modernizing the popularity of Linux is the Linux Mint distribution. Launched in 2006 by Clément Lefèbvre, it is based on Ubuntu and is intended to be very user-friendly and particularly suitable for beginners.

Linux Mint is the result of a major design change in Ubuntu. Lefèbvre managed to pick up where Ubuntu left off. One of its pillars is the internal development of the Cinnamon desktop environment.

Another reason for the growing popularity of Linux Mint is its blending of certain proprietary software to improve the convenience of the user when installing the available options themselves. Other modern Linux distributions do this as well. But Linux Mint makes it a central point of its user interface standard.

Seemingly limitless options

Depending on the counting process and the source, the actual number of Linux distributions is much larger today than during the first two decades of the Linux kernel. Some sources put that number at over 600 Linux distributions with around 500 in active development. Yet other sources estimate the number of Linux distributions to be over 1,000.

It all depends on how you categorize the wide variety of form factors ranging from desktops, servers, laptops, netbooks, mobile phones, and tablets. Some distributions are managed by a single developer. Others encompass large communities of volunteers, designers, coders and testers globally. It seems that for every Linux distro that goes inactive or disappears altogether, one or more newcomers fill the void.

This is all the result of you, Mr. Birthday Linux. Your power and influence are awesome!

Inclusion with diversity

The Linux operating system has unwittingly become a place for all the old and new computer concepts possible. Distribution developers made many versions that mimicked and improved the features and innovations of other distributions. Depending on the whims of the Linux developers, different distributions have been offered for the computer styles of different people.

Two main avenues of development have emerged. Either a new distribution version would follow the design and operating philosophy of a particular Linux family – be it Gentoo, Arch, Debian, Suse, Fedora, etc. – or it would be an independent offer not based on a particular Linux family. In addition, subfamilies exist under Linux.


For example, a cast could be based on a major family line but create some of its own unique elements. Consider that a very popular Linux line is Ubuntu, which is technically based on Debian. New distributions have appeared, based directly on Ubuntu rather than the larger Debian ecosystem.

Part of the derived distribution would be the unique app choices bundled together in the release. Some derivatives do not have access to many software repositories from the major Linux families. Others have different update processes and package management tools for adding software.

Another distinctive element of the Linux operating system is the concept of desktop environments. Some distributions only offer one chosen desktop. Others offer a wide range of desktop options. Some distributions are lightweight, which means they run on older hardware that requires less RAM and less powerful internals.

These scaled-down designs often rely on window managers instead of full desktop environments. The same can be said of the structure and operating components built into independent Linux distributions.

Design factors

This is what sets the Linux operating system apart from other alternatives like macOS and Windows operating systems. The operating environment can be of classic Linux design. It can be minimal, or it can be something more feature rich. It all comes down to user interface (UI) and user preferences.

Just as distribution developers slice and slice UI components and the Linux family, they often modify existing functionality in the desktop design. So two different distributions running the same desktop environment can look very different.

Not all Linux distributions run the same Linux kernel either. Some distribution developers avoid potential compatibility issues with the latest kernel versions by waiting for a release cycle or two of their own distribution products. Other distribution developers are basing their latest distribution upgrade on a newly released kernel version.

Add a modern touch

The Linux kernel, although 30 years old as the core of the Linux operating system, is not the same today as it was when it first started. Torvalds oversees an ongoing process of updating the Linux kernel to provide improved hardware, software and security reliability.

Just as Linux kernel developers and distribution managers update, modify, and improve (or sometimes worsen) performance, so too do desktop environment communities. Once popular designs and features can fall out of favor. Design changes can send users yelling at other options in Linux.

It’s also the power and flexibility that Linux has gained over the past three decades.

So again, happy birthday Linux. You’ve had great success dominating corporate server jobs and taking control of cloud computing.

Yet you haven’t given us the year of the Linux desktop yet. But keep growing. I hope you will have reasons to celebrate this holiday on a future anniversary.

The options you provide make modern Linux an operating system like no other. You’ve even established your family ties on Android and Chrome OS. But these are accolades for other anniversary celebrations.

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Debian 11 officially debuts and hits the mark • The Register https://greguti.com/debian-11-officially-debuts-and-hits-the-mark-the-register/ https://greguti.com/debian-11-officially-debuts-and-hits-the-mark-the-register/#respond Mon, 16 Aug 2021 02:56:00 +0000 https://greguti.com/debian-11-officially-debuts-and-hits-the-mark-the-register/

The Debian Project has released the eleventh version of its Linux distribution.

Code-named Bullseye, the distro appeared on Saturday and will be supported for five years – a lifecycle made possible by its use of Linux kernel version 5.10, which itself is a long-term support version that will be. maintained until 2026.

Some of the new features that the project saw fit to highlight include:

  • Native support for exFAT file systems is part of the kernel, rather than requiring the use of the separate FUSE driver;
  • Support for the GNOME Flashback desktop environment if installed as part of the task-gnome-flashback-desktop package. KDE Plasma 5.20, LXDE 11, LXQt 0.16, MATE 1.24 and Xfce 4.16 are other desktop options;
  • USB printers can be treated as network devices with the new ipp-usb package, which means driverless printing includes printers connected by USB.
  • Unmanned scanning is also new, thanks to sane-sl in the libsane1 package;
  • Win32-loader software allows installation of Debian from Windows without using separate installation media, now supports UEFI and Secure Boot.
  • Panfrost and Lima drivers to enable free support for GPUs found in many ARM devices;
  • Podman 3.0.1, a daemonless container engine developed by Red Hat that can replace Docker;
  • Support for non-systemd boot systems is significantly improved over Buster.

There are many more, of course – as you would expect given that the distribution includes 59,551 packages, of which 11,294 are new. And while 9,519 packages were marked as obsolete and removed, 42,821 packages were updated and 5,434 packages remained unchanged.

Eight CPU architectures are supported. To know:

  • 32-bit PC (i386) and 64-bit PC (amd64);
  • 64-bit arming (arm64);
  • ARM EABI (armel);
  • ARMv7 (ABI hard-float EABI, armhf);
  • MIPS little-endian (mipsel);
  • 64-bit little-endian MIPS (mips64el);
  • 64-bit little-endian PowerPC (ppc64el);
  • IBM System z (s390x).

The new version also updates commonly used open source databases such as Samba, MariaDB, PHP, Perl, Apache, Python, Rust, and Emacs, bringing them to newer versions.

“With this wide selection of packages and its traditional support for an extended architecture, Debian once again remains true to its goal of being the universal operating system,” says the project’s release announcement.

“It’s suitable for many different use cases: from desktop systems to netbooks; from development servers to cluster systems; and for database, web, and storage servers.

“At the same time, additional quality assurance efforts such as automatic installation and upgrade testing for all packages in the Debian archive ensure that Bullseye meets the high user expectations of a stable release of Debian.

You can test these claims yourself by uploading a live image or disk image.

The full release notes can be found here.

Bullseye’s release will be significant as Debian is the basis for many popular Linux distributions such as Ubuntu, Devuan, and Raspbian. ®

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On the go and at home, HP launches Chrome OS line extension https://greguti.com/on-the-go-and-at-home-hp-launches-chrome-os-line-extension/ https://greguti.com/on-the-go-and-at-home-hp-launches-chrome-os-line-extension/#respond Tue, 10 Aug 2021 14:50:00 +0000 https://greguti.com/on-the-go-and-at-home-hp-launches-chrome-os-line-extension/

After landing in the right place at a tight time when millions of displaced students needed something that offered at least a keyboard and webcam, Chrome OS has seen tremendous growth over the past year. Google’s desktop operating system, which powers many laptops so cheap they would make the clunky netbooks of yore expensive, now accounts for about one in five PCs sold in the United States. Android, Linux apps, progressive web apps, and virtualized and cloud-hosted versions of Windows.

Progress contrasts with early attempts to bring Android into desktop environments (including HP SlateBooks circa 2013). Still, as Android did with phones, Chrome OS struggles to break out of its status as the go-to operating system for the under $ 300 bundles of articulated mediocrity. Google tried to shatter that perception itself with a progression of ambitious Chrome OS devices, including the MacBook-style Pixelbook, Pixel C, and Pixel Slate, before releasing the more mainstream and less inspiring Pixelbook Go.

Now, however, after turning to partners to complement the mid-range and high-end flappers and 2-in-1s, Google appears to be working closely with some partners on hero devices. It is reminiscent of the spirit, if not the co-branding, of the old Nexus program. After all, following the influx of Chrome OS into homes during the pandemic, PC makers may be making the case for extending the device family to Chrome OS customers. This week, HP jumped at the opportunity with two devices that push Chrome OS out of its wide-bezel plastic comfort zone.

The first is HP’s Chromebook x2 11, a follow-up to its 2018 12.3-inch x2 Chromebook 2. A 2-in-1 tablet with both a removable keyboard and a kickstand, the x2 11 is like a version of luxury of the Lenovo Chromebook Duet. , another product that Google has helped guide. The HP tablet replaces a Qualcomm Snapdragon 7c – itself an example of the expansion of the Chrome OS ecosystem after a long flirtation – for the MediaTek device in the Duet. Compared to this device, the new x2 also offers a higher resolution display (2160×1440) with a 3X2 aspect ratio (a Pixelbook feature before the Go), a fingerprint reader (especially useful for devices used in multiple orientations), a second USB-C connector, and further the company’s long-standing collaboration with Bang & Olufsen for tuned speakers.

hp-chrome-family-august-2021-new-shot2.jpg

As well as including the kickstand and keyboard in the box, the device also includes a stylus that charges magnetically similar to Apple Pencil. This adds to the growing number of products supporting the Universal Stylus Initiative’s stylus standard supported by HP, Lenovo, Dell, Intel, Google and others. The x2 11 will also see the debut of a progressive web app from Google that the company plans to bring to other Chromebooks. Dubbed Cursive, it represents a note-taking experience that is a bit more like the OneNote approach than Google Keep, which relies on a sticky note-like metaphor.

HP’s other foray is a desktop PC with a 90-degree swivel screen in the long-overlooked Chromebase all-in-one category. Here, again, there is precedent from Lenovo, which introduced the Windows-based Yoga AIO 7 before CES. Sporting a tapered base compared to Lenovo’s flat base, the HP Chromebase 21.5-inch All-in-One Desktop PC offers a smaller rotating screen than Lenovo’s 27-inch offering. It also trades in the AMD Ryzen 7 processor and Lenovo’s nVidia GPU for an Intel Pentium Gold with integrated graphics.

The Yoga can also double as a USB-C monitor for external devices, although there are third-party Android apps like Duet (unrelated to the Lenovo 2-in-1) that allow Chrome OS devices to do the same if the The host is a Windows PC or Mac. On the other hand, both products support HP QuckDrop, the HP version of AirDrop-type instant sharing which, unlike the native Chrome OS proximity sharing, works on Windows.

Coincidentally, both HP products are expected to retail for $ 599. Unsurprisingly, given their specs, that means the Chromebook x2 11 will cost around double the price of the Lenovo Chromebook Duet, while the Chromebase 21.5 will cost $ 1,000 less than the price of the Yoga desktop, which does. no case has been initiated in the United States.

The x2 11 might be an attractive option for those who have been drawn to the Duet but want a more upscale offering; it might grab the attention of those looking at the Surface Go as well. While it uses a mid-level Snapdragon, it’s also a lot cheaper than most of the 2-in-1 Windows we’ve seen with Snapdragon processors. . The Chromebase might work well as a shared PC, especially for families whose students still take distance education; that’s hundreds of dollars less than HP’s cheapest Windows All-in-One. Beyond individual product perspectives, however, both send the message that Chrome OS is ready to take Windows in form factors beyond those of mainstream laptops, capitalizing on the playbook to offer less options. expensive than Windows-based competition from trusted brands to extend their appeal.

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Valve says he couldn’t find a game the Steam Deck can’t handle https://greguti.com/valve-says-he-couldnt-find-a-game-the-steam-deck-cant-handle/ https://greguti.com/valve-says-he-couldnt-find-a-game-the-steam-deck-cant-handle/#respond Mon, 26 Jul 2021 12:02:02 +0000 https://greguti.com/valve-says-he-couldnt-find-a-game-the-steam-deck-cant-handle/ This site can earn affiliate commissions from the links on this page. Terms of use.

According to Valve, the Steam Deck is more than capable of chewing up titles on the PC platform, despite its relatively low hardware specs. Whether an APU has the chops to drive traditional PC games is a valid question. While Nintendo has sold a lot of switches with weaker hardware than the Steam Deck. Nintendo also has an army of developers who explicitly code for its platforms and their hardware. Valve’s Steam Deck might get special attention from developers who want to support it, but it’s not exactly the same as targeting the device from day one.

Valve’s official message is that the system is AAA gaming ready.

“We’ve looked at various games over the last few years in the catalog, but the real test for us was the games that came out last year. They just couldn’t perform very well on the previous types of prototypes and architectures we were testing, ”Valve’s Pierre-Loup Griffais told IGN. “This is the first time that we have achieved the level of performance required to really run the latest generation of games without problems. All of the games that we wanted to be playable are, in fact, the entire Steam library. We didn’t really find anything we could throw on this device that it couldn’t handle.

The Steam Deck has several advantages that can make this possible, although a recent laptop comparison by PCMag found that even high-end integrated systems are still marginal for 1080p PC gaming. For starters, the Steam Deck runs at 1280 × 800, which is just over 1MP. It’s just a little less than half the resolution of a 1080p screen. The switch operates at 1280 × 720 to reduce bandwidth pressure and battery life as well.

Integrated graphics solutions are still tied to memory bandwidth, partly because the economy prohibits huge memory connections at these price points, and partly because the CPU and GPU share the bus together. This is where the Steam Deck has another advantage over any integrated shipping solution today. It uses a four-channel LPDDR5x solution with 4 × 32-bit memory channels of LPDDR5x-5500. This corresponds to 88 GB / s of memory bandwidth. This is a substantial boost beyond what the DDR4-3200 (51.2 Gb / s) offers. We also know that the APU inside the Steam Deck uses an RDNA2-derived GPU, which should be worth at least 1.25x IPC compared to the old Vega architecture.

I’m not sure how much performance improvement we can expect from the built-in RDNA2 over the built-in Vega. The GPU inside the Radeon 5800U is clocked at 2 GHz, while the GPU inside the Steam Deck will run between 1 GHz and 1.6 GHz. We would expect RDNA2 to be significantly more efficient than Vega, but AMD and Valve may have prioritized adapting the performance of AMD’s current APUs to a lower power envelope.

Good news ? RDNA2 shows all the signs of a very energy efficient architecture, especially at low clock. We don’t know if the semi-custom chip that Valve is purchasing for this project includes additional cache for the onboard GPU, but even assuming it doesn’t, the additional memory bandwidth – 1.72 times more than the 5800U – should still pay off. We wouldn’t be surprised if the RDNA2-based GPU gained at least 1.25x to 1.3x performance just through the memory bandwidth upgrade, not knowing anything about how much higher RDNA2’s CPI is. compensated by lower clocks.

We can’t precisely quantify the improvement in the drop to 720p from 1080p, but again, we would expect it to be 1.15x to 1.25x as a minimum. Reducing the resolution has always been one of the best ways to improve GPU performance, and while the gains are rarely linear (unless you’re in a totally GPU-related situation), they’re usually substantial. .

The above graphic is from PCMag’s recent 1080p iGPU laptop games comparison. As you can see, 1080p is a tough sell for these systems in AAA, although they all do better in esports and simulation titles. ExtremeTech’s estimate is that the Steam Deck should be at least 1.4 times faster at 720p compared to these 1080p tests. Total gains of 1.7x to 2x or more are not impossible, although much of this depends on the specifics of the title in question, its response to RDNA2 over Vega, the strength of Valve’s cooler and the overall effectiveness of AMD APUs. GPU sustained clock will matter a lot here.

If you assume a 1.5-fold increase over the PCMag laptop numbers above, Valve’s prediction starts to make more sense. Games like Far Cry 5 and Borderlands 3 would break the 30fps line at 1280 × 800. The Steam Deck presumably doesn’t use FreeSync, which is a bit unfortunate – technology like FreeSync would shine in situations like this. here – but 30fps is still a big mark for smooth gameplay, and a 1.5x boost gets us there.

The only downside to all of this is that some games may still require 720p and poorly detailed settings to function properly. Valve’s tech specs for the Steam Deck stated that the GPU clock ranges from 1 GHz to 1.6 GHz, which is a pretty wide range.

What about future games?

There’s a big difference between the Steam Deck and the Switch that impacts how customers view Valve’s handheld in the long run. When Sony, Microsoft, or Nintendo release a handheld, the end user knows they are purchasing guaranteed compatibility with future titles over a period of time. Outside of the Dreamcast, even short-lived consoles like the Wii U have been Nintendo’s fastest platform for four years.

In the PC world, the day you buy a PC is the day you trade the theory of performance faster than you could buy in 6-18 months to see the real performance available today. The Switch is already four years old. While there are still rumors of a future 4K Switch equipped with DLSS, nobody expects Nintendo to release a new platform for another 2 to 2.5 years. Console makers typically don’t retire an old platform the day they roll out the new one, so the total window that the Switch will be supported could easily last 8 years.

The Steam Deck is unlikely to enjoy that kind of longevity, but PC gamers don’t have a cultural expectation of that kind of life expectancy either. A well-built and upgradeable desktop can last 6-10 years as a gaming PC these days, but laptops don’t last as long.

This could play out in different ways depending on who buys the Steam Deck and what it’s used for. The Steam Deck won’t be powerful enough to run ray tracing workloads in AAA titles, but Valve could work with developers to implement a special “Steam Deck mode” with settings that allow games to be played. on low-end equipment. Back in the days when netbooks were popular, some games added a “netbook mode” specifically to improve performance on low-end hardware. The fact that Steam Deck is all built on a common hardware platform could prompt Valve to optimize the Source Engine for its own CPU and GPU platform and help developers deliver the best possible performance.

It’s, of course, also possible that the Steam Deck is just another example of Valve having a clever idea that it doesn’t follow, like the Steam Machines were. We’re not big fans of pre-orders, and the Steam Deck is no exception. But this device has the potential to be something interesting and Valve seems to realize how important it is to deliver on all fronts.

One thing to keep in mind: Saying that Valve couldn’t find a game that couldn’t run on Steam Deck for performance reasons isn’t the same as saying Steam Deck can run all games. Steam. We still don’t know what the Proton compatibility situation will be by December, but currently there are some important games that are not supported by Linux.

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